We’d like to extend a special thanks to Yayoi Lena Winfrey of Watermelon Sushi and Hip Hapa Homeez. For her monthly feature interview on Watermelon Sushi World, Yayoi recently interviewed Anomaly’s director, Jessica Chen Drammeh, about growing up multiracial, the filmmaking process, and Anomaly. Here’s a couple excerpts from “Anomalies R Us”:

Q: Your film seems so thorough and not just the usual angst about “What am I?” Did you first develop a script, or was it your interviewees that made it less emotional and more intellectual?

A: While making the film, we developed an “interactive” process of sorts, where we would shoot, edit, and then have work-in-progress screenings for feedback. We’d repeat this process over several stages. Many filmmakers don’t like to do this because it risks changing the vision of the film too early!

We wanted community participation, in fact…Developing a rapport with the participants was fundamental, because we wanted to get a real look at their personal lives…We also had the insight of veteran filmmaker/professor Sam Pollard, who became a consulting editor to the project.

Read more of the interview at Watermelon Sushi World!

And, if you are in the NYC area, don’t forget about our screening on May 12 with Gabriella Callender performing live!

We are proud to be preparing for a Northwest/Seattle premiere at the Langston Hughes African American Film Festival. In attendance will be both Director/Producer Jessica Chen Drammeh and Co-Producer Sharon Smith!

* SEATTLE PREMIERE *

Langston Hughes African American Film Festival

>When: Sunday, April 18 at 1:30 pm

>Where: Central Cinema, 1411 21st Avenue (at Union), Seattle, WA 98122, (206) 686-6684

>For more info, check out http://www.langstonarts.org/?p=1154

>Buy tickets ($8) in person at Central Cinema or online

>Filmmakers in attendance: Q&A will follow screening with Director/Producer Jessica Chen Drammeh and Co-Producer Sharon Smith!

Barack Obama’s presidency has brought conversations on racial identity to the forefront. ANOMALY is a groundbreaking documentary film that takes an insider’s look at the experiences of multiracial Americans. Through personal narratives, ANOMALY stimulates viewers to think about identity, family and community in a changing world.

The film features interviews and performances with singer/songwriter Gabriella Callender of Mahina Movement, spoken word artist Michelle Myers of Yellow Rage, poet/musician Pete Shungu, author/poet Thaddeus Rutkowski, along with community leaders and academic experts.

Screening co-sponsored by the MAVIN Foundation, which serves mixed heritage people and families, including those who identify as biracial, mixed race, multiracial, multiethnic, transracial and transnational adoptees, and people in interracial relationships. Based in Seattle, MAVIN is committed to building stronger communities by supporting mixed heritage people and families, working for social justice and raising awareness about the complexities of race, racism, and identity.

The Langston Hughes African American Film Festival supports community building by providing opportunities for artists and audiences to connect using the medium of film as a catalyst for dialogue that leads to social change. The festival creates year round opportunities to enhance media literacy, self-reflection, and community discussion. By creating the shared experience of films that are by and about Black people, the festival is a creative and collaborative opportunity to build cultural competency across the aisle and across neighborhoods in greater Seattle.

The Langston Hughes Performing Arts Center celebrates, nurtures, presents and preserves African American performing arts and cultural legacies. This year, the Center is under renovation, and screenings will be held at a variety of venues in Seattle.

Spread the word to your friends, and meet us in Seattle!

Enjoy the film and the Q&A,

Jessica and Sharon